photography

Blog


Welcome to our blog. Here, you can keep up with our latest projects and news, get insights into the world of visual storytelling and communication for development and go behind the scenes to meet the creative team responsible for our work.

10th March, 2016
adobe, colour, colour wheel, triad, colour psychology, colour theory, communication for development, C4D

Voices in Colour: Three Reasons Why Using Colour is Imperative for Fulfilling our Visual Storytelling Mission

Did you know that the human eye can see and differentiate approximately seven to ten million colours and tones? Our eyes and brains are amazing instruments. It’s little wonder that marketing experts have been manipulating our purchasing preferences through the use of colour for decades, if not centuries. Here at Communication for Development, we live for vibrant colours! You’re unlikely to [...]
16th June, 2016
Oxfam, photo book, cover design, photography, South East Asia, Vietnam, visual storytelling, farmer, aerial photo, women, gender

From Bamboo Nurseries to Broomstick Sellers: Documenting Oxfam’s Projects in Vietnam

Over the last couple of months, several of our team members have been working on a mission to document and visually depict the impact of 21 of Oxfam’s projects across the length and breadth of Vietnam. Working closely with the communications team of the organisation’s country office, our brief was to create a glossy, bilingual, coffee table sized book that could be presented to corporate donors [...]
1st July, 2017

Ethical Responsibility in Development Photography

Some people may argue long-gone are the days of ‘poverty porn’ running rampant throughout the development sector, but it’s now 2018 and apparently old habits die hard. The term ‘poverty porn’ is used to describe the practices of development NGOs, charities, and foundations that inappropriately portray benefactors as desperate individuals in need of philanthropic donations. Their images are used to create emotions of guilt and subsequently solicit donations. Such practices have heavy colonial undertones and unfortunately can still be found within aid efforts today. Radi Aid is a Scandinavian student run watchdog for international development projects. Every year they call-out various stereotype-riddled aid campaigns for inappropriate communication methods. In an effort to make sure organisations remain accountable for their actions, a ‘most offensive’ campaign award is given out annually. Radi-Aid continues to critique the use of ‘poverty tourism’ and the portrayal of a ‘savior complex’ in development communication materials. In parallel to these criticisms, the organisation also annually applauds campaigns that work to break down prejudices and stereotypes within the development sector. The strong movement towards ethical practices in development communication has been picked up by NGOs, governments, and individuals around the world. In 2007 Ireland drafted the Dóchas Code […]